Fight Fire
SEARCH

ABOUT
Anything from training articles to calls that we have gone on in my area, to issues going on in the fire service around the country. Whatever I feel as important. I would also like a place to record calls to be able to look back on in twenty years or so. This isn't just limited to firefighting as a first responder it will also be covering ems.

[these are my opinions and they do not reflect on my department in anyway]

ASK ME ANYTHING

LINKS

this is interesting. I see some pros and cons. but it will be interesting to see how this might cause other smoke alarms to develop in the future. Plus the concept behind this is good and there is definitely room for improvement when it comes to smoke detectors.

For More Click Here

Video Link Here

 
SMYTH COUNTY, Va. — A tanker-truck wreck sent plumes of black smoke into the air near an interstate Wednesday afternoon.
One person was flown from the scene of the accident and the Virginia Department of Transportation reported that both southbound lanes were closed, according to WDBJ7.com.
Source

 

SMYTH COUNTY, Va. — A tanker-truck wreck sent plumes of black smoke into the air near an interstate Wednesday afternoon.

One person was flown from the scene of the accident and the Virginia Department of Transportation reported that both southbound lanes were closed, according to WDBJ7.com.

Source

Where were you when the world stopped turning? For 343 families in New York and hundreds of families in Virginia and Pennsylvania we knew where are loved ones were, on duty. To many of us it comes as no surprise as we understood the deep commitment that all emergency services providers have throughout history. We understood that it is a calling, not a career.  But on that fateful day the world watched as these brave men and women showed their true selves.

These brave responders rushed toward a situation where countless innocent people needed help and they answered the call. Many of us can think back to that day and how we sat, drawn to the televisions watching the fire, EMS, and police officers save lives and take risks that most people could not fathom.  It was a day where heroes showed up, not in capes, but in uniforms.

In this jumpseat riders opinion, Sept. 11, quite possibly, could be the best day in the emergency services history. How could you say such a thing? 

That day when the cowards attacked us, thousands of first responders had the world’s attention as they watched the responders rush in to danger. Carrying victims, ushering people away, and saving countless lives, with no regard for their own safety, time and time again. 

This one day in history every pair of eyes in the world watched the responders performing countless rescues and showed what the fabric of their existence really is. The world was watching first responders do something amazing, their jobs. 

Many may not have understood what it was like to serve thier community, until that day.  Until the day where so many gave so much.

Some 12 years later many things have changed in our world, with one exception.  The brave men and women of today’s fire service stand ready to rush in.  Every second of every minute we are here.  

Let’s make today about honoring the sacrifice of so many people by reaching out to the families of these men and women and saying  “thank you.” While we all remember where we were when the world stopped turning, these families knew that this was the day that their loved one will not be coming home.

Honoring the sacrifice of so many shouldn’t come once a year, it should come with every breath you take. Being a firefighter you are part of something bigger.  You are a part of those responders who gave so much on 9/11 and we should carry their memories with us until it’s our
- Ryan Pennington

and still counting.

Never Forget.


"If you’re not thinking forward, you are already behind! Difference makers prepare and shape their future by always thinking of innovative ways to accomplish a goal. So, are you a progressive thinker, or a complacent wallflower? Always make a difference." -Fire Engineering

"If you’re not thinking forward, you are already behind! Difference makers prepare and shape their future by always thinking of innovative ways to accomplish a goal. So, are you a progressive thinker, or a complacent wallflower? Always make a difference." -Fire Engineering

Man Alive: The Bronx Is Burning Part 1

Man Alive: The Bronx Is Burning Part 2

Man Alive: The Bronx Is Burning Part 3

Man Alive: The Bronx Is Burning Part 4

Can we all take a moment for Brendan McDonough, I can’t even to begin to comprehend all the pain and guilt he must be going through. 
Keep your head up and keep fighting brother, you are in our thoughts and prayers, as well as the rest of the Prescott Fire Department and the family and friends of those lost.

Can we all take a moment for Brendan McDonough, I can’t even to begin to comprehend all the pain and guilt he must be going through.

Keep your head up and keep fighting brother, you are in our thoughts and prayers, as well as the rest of the Prescott Fire Department and the family and friends of those lost.

Recently, with the death of 4 Houston, TX Firefighters one of their own members wrote a post to his facebook page intended for his friends & family. He made it public and some of our members who have connections to firefighters in the Houston area saw the post. Its an excellent depiction and description of how this job works and how it affects people. Take a read. Thanks.

May 31 2013 
Just my thoughts of yesterday

Yesterday around 10:30 a.m., I was working my side job when we got a working house fire. It was burning pretty good and as most firemen know, nothing like a good house fire to start the day off right? After we put it out, I went to put my gear up and that’s when I looked at my phone and learned that members from my station just pulled a mayday and there had been a collapse. Upon learning of the first LODD (Line of Duty Death) I left my side job and headed to my station. The members from Engine and Ladder 51 A-shift were already at the station and the looks on their faces reminded me of February 19, 2005. It was the same look my fellow brothers and I had as we had just lost our captain in a house fire. I knew this was going to be a long day for them. What I didn’t know was what was about to come next as I was asked to tell the crew of the loss of two of their own. I just learned that they had been taken from the fire so quickly they did not know of the loss of their brothers. I felt some pride knowing that news like this should always come from one of your own, in this case a member of 51s, but I was heart broken just the same. Seeing their tears as their hopes of good news were destroyed by my words. I walked out of the room and told a good friend that was the hardest thing I ever had to do. I was so wrong.

Thirty minutes later I found myself standing next to Chief Mann as he told a beautiful, young and loving woman that the man she loved was gone. As a fireman we never see that side. I would not allow myself to cry because I wanted to be strong for her. I wanted to be strong for the chief, who was doing the most dreaded part of this job. Her words of how he, her fireman had hugged her goodbye just a few hours earlier in a way he normal doesn’t do and how her son loved him will stay with me forever. Over the next several hours, the chaos was in full swing at Station 51. The honor I felt as I saw countless brothers and sisters come together to help is always heartwarming.

As the night was winding down and it was time to load the members of A-shift onto a bus to be taken downtown, I was still rattled by the thought of being the one to tell them of their loss. I did the only thing I thought I could do. As they filed out of the back of the station one at a time, I stood at the back gate and met each one of them with a final hug from a member of Station 51. I hope that my small token of support and parting words comforted them for the ride downtown. With A-shift gone, it was time to find my beloved Tracey, who had been there for six hours patiently waiting. While all other men got to stand and be with their families she was not allowed the same comfort of her man that the other wives received as I was doing my best to keep things going. I will always be grateful for her and the other wives and loved ones that truly carry a much greater burden then any uniformed member of HFD will ever know.

As I look over this letter my thoughts don’t stray too far from my true belief of this job, which is that firemen will always die. As long as we do this job, there is NO promise that everyone goes home no matter what the administration feels.

There are two things that get me through days like this. One is Knowing the best way to honor our fallen brothers is continue to make the runs, gear up, go inside and put out the fires. We do our jobs, because civilians are counting on us. This is what they would have wanted.

The second is knowing that there are so many ways to die in this world; cancer, drunk drivers, strokes and diseases, none of them would we wish on even our most hated enemy. But there are a rare few men and women who get a true gift from God that 99.9 percent of the world does not get. That gift is dying while doing something they truly loved to do. For that reason I cannot be sad. It makes me smile and gives me a small bit of peace knowing that we all chose this job and we all love this job. That is gift I will never take for granted.

Rest in peace my brothers. The bells will be silent for you tonight.

Capt Jon Drew
51 D-shift
Houston Fire Department

(Source: facebook.com)


Houston Firefighter Anne Sullivan was among four firefighters who died Friday, May 31, 2013 Anne Sullivan was a gifted athlete filled with energy who came out of high school with a focus on being a firefighter. But about a month after graduating from the Houston Fire Department Academy, the 24-year-old was among four firefighters who died while searching for people they thought might be trapped in a blazing Houston motel and restaurant. “She had a lot of energy and had her heart set at that,” her father, Jack Sullivan, told The Associated Press on Saturday. Also killed in the collapse during the Friday afternoon fire at the Southwest Inn were: Capt. Matthew Renaud, 35, who had been with department for 11½ years; Engineer Operator Robert Bebee, 41, who joined the department almost 12 years ago; and Firefighter Robert Garner, 29, who joined the department 2½ years ago. The Houston Fire Department said 14 firefighters were taken to the hospital Friday. One remained in critical condition on Saturday and another underwent surgery. The rest were in stable condition and several have been released from the hospital. The fire broke out just after noon at a restaurant connected to the Southwest Inn along a busy freeway and quickly spread to the section of the building housing the motel. About 150 firefighters responded and were able to get it under control within about two hours. The fire was the deadliest in the 118-year history of the department. Fire Capt. Ruy Lozano said at a news conference Saturday that firefighters were turning to each other and their families as they grieved their colleagues. “Anytime one of your brothers or sisters are affected, it’s not just that, it’s also a reminder of the inherent danger of this profession. It reminds you. It reminds your family,” said Lozano, who also said that a memorial for the firefighters is tentatively set for Wednesday. Fire officials said they took a high risk in aggressively fighting the fire because they believed people were inside the motel. When a portion of the building collapsed, the firefighters were trapped. “It was an occupied structure, during business hours. There was every indication to think there was a life to be saved,” Lozano said. Anne Sullivan, a soccer player and cross country runner in high school, joined the Wharton County Junior College Fire Academy after graduation. She graduated from the Houston Fire Department Academy in April. Jack Sullivan said he was on his way home from work Friday when he heard about the fire and realized it was in his daughter’s area. “I’m thinking she could be involved, but maybe not,” he said. About 10 minutes later he heard that four firefighters had died in the blaze and began crying in his car. As he approached his house, he saw an emergency vehicle parked outside and knew his daughter was among those who had died. “I knew right that instant,” Sullivan said. Story from www.kirotv.com ~ by JAMIE STENGLE ~ Associated Press Photo credit: Associated Press ~ Dan Lipsanen via Sullivan Family Publisher’s note:  All firefighters who die in the line of duty deserve the highest honor. This post intent is not to overstate or glorify women in the fire service… it’s to pay Sister Anne honor for being part of the special service called “Sisterhood”, however brief it was. Many sad and tragic days in the Texas Fire Service this year. Rest in Peace Sister Anne… until we meet again on the “Top Floor”

Houston Firefighter Anne Sullivan was among four firefighters who died Friday, May 31, 2013

Anne Sullivan was a gifted athlete filled with energy who came out of high school with a focus on being a firefighter. But about a month after graduating from the Houston Fire Department Academy, the 24-year-old was among four firefighters who died while searching for people they thought might be trapped in a blazing Houston motel and restaurant.

“She had a lot of energy and had her heart set at that,” her father, Jack Sullivan, told The Associated Press on Saturday.

Also killed in the collapse during the Friday afternoon fire at the Southwest Inn were: Capt. Matthew Renaud, 35, who had been with department for 11½ years; Engineer Operator Robert Bebee, 41, who joined the department almost 12 years ago; and Firefighter Robert Garner, 29, who joined the department 2½ years ago.

The Houston Fire Department said 14 firefighters were taken to the hospital Friday. One remained in critical condition on Saturday and another underwent surgery. The rest were in stable condition and several have been released from the hospital.

The fire broke out just after noon at a restaurant connected to the Southwest Inn along a busy freeway and quickly spread to the section of the building housing the motel. About 150 firefighters responded and were able to get it under control within about two hours.

The fire was the deadliest in the 118-year history of the department.

Fire Capt. Ruy Lozano said at a news conference Saturday that firefighters were turning to each other and their families as they grieved their colleagues.

“Anytime one of your brothers or sisters are affected, it’s not just that, it’s also a reminder of the inherent danger of this profession. It reminds you. It reminds your family,” said Lozano, who also said that a memorial for the firefighters is tentatively set for Wednesday.

Fire officials said they took a high risk in aggressively fighting the fire because they believed people were inside the motel. When a portion of the building collapsed, the firefighters were trapped. “It was an occupied structure, during business hours. There was every indication to think there was a life to be saved,” Lozano said.

Anne Sullivan, a soccer player and cross country runner in high school, joined the Wharton County Junior College Fire Academy after graduation. She graduated from the Houston Fire Department Academy in April.

Jack Sullivan said he was on his way home from work Friday when he heard about the fire and realized it was in his daughter’s area. “I’m thinking she could be involved, but maybe not,” he said.

About 10 minutes later he heard that four firefighters had died in the blaze and began crying in his car. As he approached his house, he saw an emergency vehicle parked outside and knew his daughter was among those who had died.

“I knew right that instant,” Sullivan said.


Story from www.kirotv.com ~ by JAMIE STENGLE ~ Associated Press

Photo credit: Associated Press ~ Dan Lipsanen via Sullivan Family

Publisher’s note:

All firefighters who die in the line of duty deserve the highest honor. This post intent is not to overstate or glorify women in the fire service… it’s to pay Sister Anne honor for being part of the special service called “Sisterhood”, however brief it was.

Many sad and tragic days in the Texas Fire Service this year.

Rest in Peace Sister Anne… until we meet again on the “Top Floor”

Friday, May 31, 2013 As previously posted, the HFD lost 4 Firefighters in the Line of Duty this afternoon following a fire and collapse. The following are the HFD members who gave the ultimate sacrifice at that fire in Southwest Houston this afternoon:


Captain EMT Matthew Renaud (35) of Engine 68. He began his career with the Houston Fire Department in October of 2001 and in addition to Fire Station 68, has served out of stations 51, 39, 83, 73, 37, 60 and 35.


Engineer Operator EMT Robert Bebee (41) of Station 51. He began his career with the Houston Fire Department in August of 2001 and in addition to Fire Station 51, has served out of Stations 37, 40, 10 and 48.


Firefighter EMT Robert Garner (29) of Station 68. He began his career with the Houston Fire Department in October of 2010 and has served out of Fire Station 68 since.

Probationary Firefighter Anne Sullivan (24) of Station 68. She graduated from Houston Fire Department Academy this past April and was assigned to Fire Station 68.

(Source: firefighterclosecalls.com)